Tony Jones | Kenny Wollesen | Charles Burnham | Pitch, Rhythm, and Consciousness | NA1049LP

Tony Jones – Tenor Sax | Charles Burnham – Violin | Kenny Wollesen – Drums

Recorded February 26, 2011 at Systems Two, Brooklyn, New York. Cover art by Yanik Wagner.

Tracklist: SIDE A 1. Dear Toy (T. Jones) [5:38] 2. C.K. #1 [5:47] 3. T.K. #1 [3:50] 4. Bits (T. Jones) [3:59] 5. Howlin’ Wolf Tracklist SIDE B 1. Billie [7:17] 2. Division and Kent [4:28] 3. Jessie [5:35] 4. Four Nights [4:47]

LP (Plus Free MP3 Download Card Included)


LP (Plus Free MP3 Download Card Included)

“It’s a clinic in how fascinating, and listenable, and intelligent free jazz can be. Count this as a dark horse contender among the best jazz records of the year.” – Alan Young, Lucid Culture

Tony Jones Puts Out a Fascinating, Hypnotic New Album – Lucid Culture (Lucid Culture)

“Whether exploring the outer reaches or quiet inner spaces, the music of tenor saxophonist Tony Jones is marked by his unmistakable caressing tone and an insistent curiosity about the nature of sound. He embodies the spirit of improvisation.” – Andy Gilbert

“On this ruminative record—and, indeed, it is a record, released primarily on vinyl, with MP3 downloads available—saxophonist Tony Jones, violinist Charles Burnham and percussionist Kenny Wollesen show themselves wholly comfortable within the quiet sonic space about them. Jones is the lead voice—the lead traveler, as it were—working his way across a terrain that is at once wide open and timeless, and newly created by the musicians themselves…the album simmers along sonic thought lines that…pop with human intensity.” – Matt Marshall, All About Jazz.com

“It’s not about structure, timekeeping, loud squonking or chasing down scales at breakneck speed. Jones, Burnham and Wollesen prefer to instead to speak with each other civilly, spontaneously and communally. Jones plays his tenor with much discernment, walking the line between making every note count and not over thinking his playing. There’s much tradition and soulfulness in his mannerisms…Pitch, Rhythm and Consciousness won’t hit anybody over the head with noise because it makes the noise mysterious and discreet. Tony Jones & Co. certainly aren’t the first to approach music that way, but the distinctive way they set out to do it makes Jones’ record commendable for its creativity.” – S. Victor Aaron, Something Else Reviews.com

Tony Jones & Charles Burnham

Kenny Wollesen

LP (Plus Free MP3 Download Card Included)

LP version (Plus Free MP3 Download Card Included) (incl. shipment cost world-wide)

€ 20.00
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One thought on “Tony Jones | Kenny Wollesen | Charles Burnham | Pitch, Rhythm, and Consciousness | NA1049LP

  1. On this ruminative record—and, indeed, it is a record, released primarily on vinyl, with MP3 downloads available—saxophonist Tony Jones, violinist Charles Burnham and percussionist Kenny Wollesen show themselves wholly comfortable within the quiet sonic space about them. Jones is the lead voice—the lead traveler, as it were—working his way across a terrain that is at once wide open and timeless, and newly created by the musicians themselves.

    The opener, “Dear Toy,” one of two tunes on the record, along with “Bits,” directly credited to Jones as composer (the other tracks, presumably, being more or less free improvisational works by the trio as a whole) is also the album’s most melodic. It sets a wistful tone of remembrance that dips into depressive blues passages and fits of agitation, and serves as a familiar musical entry into the less structured explorations that are to follow. To be sure, melody resurfaces throughout the record, as do other overtly urgent passages, but on the whole, the album simmers along sonic thought lines that, despite their often languorous quality, pop with human intensity.

    Wollesen works with an array of percussive instruments—bells, gongs, rattles, hand drums, warbling sheets of metal—but never touches the drum kit, which would certainly be out of place on this project. Coupled with Burnham, the pair regularly fashions soundscapes that recall Asian music traditions. Burnham’s plucking of ringing—startling—single notes, as used to fine effect alongside Jones’ low, murmuring tones on “Billie,” would be quite at home within a Chinese folk song. “C.K. #1,” a duet between violinist and percussionist, is a haunting, psychologically disturbing exchange of gongs and scraping violin.

    Jones often sounds like a warbling Beat poet, especially on “Howlin’ Wolf,” where he preaches fine, gruff, free blues over a wild, rattling field laid down by Wollesen. Elsewhere his passages are more contemplative, with the saxophonist happy to allow quiet spots to seep into his playing or to relegate himself to a supporting role, as he does on “Jessie” by simply intoning a deep, breathy note over and over under Wollesen’s percussive forays.

    “Four Nights,” the closer, brings the album back home in a sense, with Jones opting for the most sustained melodic improvisation since the record’s opening. At just under 42 minutes, it’s not a terribly long trip from beginning to end, but much shared and contested space is covered. And, befitting music pressed to vinyl, it plays well in repeated cycles.

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