Marc D. Goldfinger | Tales of the Troll | Junkies, Angels & Demons | E-Book

I always hate to write my own introductions. Maybe someday I will budget my time correctly so I might ask someone else to do it for me. That day has not yet come. I came across a laptop computer in the ruins of an old farmhouse in Lake Ninevah, Vermont. When I booted it up, these stories opened up. It seemed as if some junkie was spinning tall tales but I thought you might like to have a look at one alternative reality, so I put them into print. These stories were all told, during one time period or another, at a dope house which everyone thinks is in New York City. It is really in Cynosure. You can look up that word in the dictionary and it will give you an idea as to the nature of the area where the heroin house is located. Being violently opposed to long introductions, especially when I am the one writing them, I shall bring this one to a close. Let me just say that I believe that these stories are true. Why do I accept, as truth, words that appear to be written by a dope fiend? It is because I, with my mind’s own eye, have seen the face of Ar Lain Ta. I also believe in Demons and Angels. — Marc D. Goldfinger, July 21, 2015. Continue reading

Maia Penfold | The Red Buddha | Hcolom Press

A FEW WORDS FROM THE EDITOR Maia Penfold, known at the time as Gerda Penfold, drifted into my life in 1974 via an envelope packed with poems. I read those poems in one setting, published them and others in a chapbook titled Done with Mirrors, and from that point on, over the next turbulent thirty-six years, Maia has been a spiritual and creative running mate who remains fiercely independent and disinclined to compromise. She is a force of nature, no less so at the age of 82 than when she was a young girl in Saskatchewan and a young woman in Los Angeles and San Francisco, and her poetry is charged with this force, an elixir of wonder and innocence, biting wit and easy sophistication, an intelligence that drills to the core. She may be the most overlooked poet of the second half of the 20th century, and it came to me (as these things tend to do) in a flash of inspiration that I needed to collect as many of her poems as I could locate and put them into book form—Maia’s life has been hard and nomadic, and many of her poems have been lost along the way. Not long after that I found myself on a ferry to Bainbridge Island off the coast of Washington where Maia then lived. Continue reading

John Bennett | U-Haul with Dinosaur | Hcolom Press

The stories in U-Haul with Dinosaur were written over a period of time stretching from the late Seventies into the new millennium. They don’t necessarily appear in the order in which they were written, and consequently the reader is at times exposed to violent shifts in style and perception from one story to the next — a little like being in a Formula-One race car with Ayrton Senna as it snakes through the Brazilian Grand Prix down shifting on the curves and roaring away at 150 mph on the straightaways. These are the last of my uncollected stories, and if there is a common thread that runs through them, it involves drinking and not drinking and love gone haywire. Continue reading

John Bennett | Children of the Sun & Earth | Hcolom Press

In John Bennett’s novel, Children of the Sun & Earth an intelligent, steady-nerved young man and veteran named Tobias climbs the rungs of power in the cutthroat world of drug dealing and heavily armed Mexican cartels. By applying the right amount of respect and confidence in meetings with the heads of the Morales cartel, the Huichol Indian tribe, all the way to Pablo Escobar, Tobias sets himself up for the ultimate showdown between the DEA, a Vietnam Colonel named Wild Harry Witherspoon, the top drug lord in the world, and a team of highly-skilled Vietnam veterans. — strong>Adam Michael Luebke – Dear Dirty America Continue reading